Research

These books clarify developments in a number of periods and investigate a range of subjects related to architecture, landscape architecture, building technology, and urbanism.
In presenting evidence of resource tensions at the beginning of the Cold War, the book offers a new perspective on the histories of architecture, technology, and environmentalism, one more fully entangled with the often competing dynamics of geopolitical and geophysical pressures.

Cover photograph by Joseph Elliott

A collaboration of Associate Professor Aaron Wunsch and lecturer Joseph Elliott, recent book 'Palazzos of Power' examines Philadelphia power generating stations built by PECO between 1900-1930.

This dissertation intends to expose the complex Russian knowledge formation of thinking the possible at the beginning of the 20th century that led to a life-world of obsessive experimentation and to a particular cultural moment when art and science were not sharply distinguished academic subjects.
Funded by the FAA, with support from the Kleinman Center, Dr. Megan Ryerson co-affiliated with the City and Regional Planning Department (School of Design) and the Department of Electrical and Systems Engineering (School of Engineering and Applied Science) and Dr. Mark Hansen from UC-Berkeley are investigating changes in FAA policy regarding airline discretionary fuel loads.
Does energy consumption influence architectural style? Should more energy-efficient buildings look different? Can that "look" be used to explain or enhance their performance?
Thermodynamic Principles of Environmental Building Design, in three parts.

In collaboration with the Federal Reserve Bank of Philadelphia’s Community Development Studies and Education Department, this plan sets forth a vision for a more equitable, diverse, and sustainable economic future for Atlantic City that gives special consideration to the needs of low and moderate-income families.  This focus on low and moderate-income families is paramount, as Atlantic City’s future has become increasingly uncertain.

Cities across the globe have been designed with a primary goal of moving people around quickly—and the costs are becoming ever more apparent. The consequences are measured in smoggy air basins, sprawling suburbs, unsafe pedestrian environments, and despite hundreds of billions of dollars in investments, a failure to stem traffic congestion. Every year our current transportation paradigm generates more than 1.25 million fatalities directly through traffic collisions.

Canal Redevelopment and the Public Realm: An Advanced Urban Design Studio in
Suzhou, China

A 2015 study by China’s Environment Ministry rated sixty percent of the country’s underground water, and one-third of its surface water, unfit for human contact. This is an especially big problem for cities that rely on canals for their cultural identity, such as Suzhou, known as the “Venice of the East.” The city’s canals date back a thousand years and rank among China’s top domestic tourist destinations, on par with the Great Wall.

Cartagena 2040: Rethinking the Role of Tourism in a Dynamic and Growing City is a plan put forth by ten graduate students in the City & Regional Planning program at the University of Pennsylvania. This plan was created through the Resilient Waterfronts studio in the fall semester of 2015 with the guidance of Ferdinando Micale, a principal at Wallace, Roberts, and Todd, a design firm in Philadelphia.

Change Over Time is a semiannual peer reviewed journal published by the University of Pennsylvania Press. The journal provides an international forum for original research and articles on the history, theory, and praxis of conservation and the built environment. Each issue is dedicated to a particular theme as a method to promote critical discourse on contemporary conservation issues from diverse perspectives both within the field and across disciplines.