Historic Preservation

Summer 2015

Architectural Conservation Praxis: Traditional Buildings / Traditional Practice
HSPV 750-901, Matero, July 20, 2015 — August 7, 2015

1 course unit. Studio. Pre-requisite: HSPV-540 or HSPV-555. Heritage Conservation Praxis is an intensive 3 week summer course designed for students pursuing studies in architectural conservation and site management and builds on the core curriculum and first-year courses. The syllabus is organized around project fieldwork supplemented by lectures, demonstrations, exercises, and site visits that will allow students to experience firsthand the design and construction of vernacular buildings and the application of traditional craft to preserve them. Through a partnership with Grand Teton National Park, students will engage in the recording, survey, and craft-related treatment of selected log and masonry structures under the supervision of Penn, NPS, and guest faculty. For Summer 2015, the course will be based in the intermountain West at Grand Teton National Park, WY. Bar BC Dude Ranch (1912), the oldest extant dude ranch in America, will be the site of the field work for the course. Bar BC Ranch displays a broad range of technical and interpretive problems related to the ranch’s original design, construction and use. Plans are currently underway to stabilize, interpret, and reuse these structures by the NPS. The course will also examine preservation issues related to the region's rich vernacular landscape and National Park heritage with visits to other sites in Grand Teton and Yellowstone National Parks and Jackson Hole. One month shared accommodation in cabins will be provided. Meals will be a communal event and prepared by a cook. Weekends (Saturday and Sunday) are free and on your own. Cost for meals (breakfast, lunch and dinner) will be approximately $400 (for 3 weeks) and travel to Jackson Hole, WY is each student’s responsibility. Students are requested to bring laptops, cameras, sleeping bags and all personal items. An additional week may be available for those interested. Course enrollment is by permit only.

Preservation Planning Praxis
HSPV 760-901, Rypkema/Mason , May 26, 2015 — June 12, 2015

1 course unit. Studio. Pre-requisite: HSPV 572 or 625 or other planning-centered coursework. This course is designed to meet two broad learning outcomes: first, solidify student's knowledge of basic city and regional planning concepts, systems and methods; second, and more extensively, apply this knowledge in a practical situation relevant to contemporary preservation planning practice. The course will be conducted over three weeks in the early summer and will have two distinct components: The first part of the course will be held in Philadelphia over three days in late May. It will focus on readings, lectures, and discussions about planning in general, applied to the U.S. Randy Mason will lead this part of the course. The second part of the course will take place in Belgrade, Serbia and will be led by Donovan Rypkema. Lasting approximately two weeks, the course's Serbian component will center on the application of preservation-led development strategies combined with creative-economy policies. Our partner in this project is the University of Belgrade, and municipal authorities in Belgrade and nearby towns. Course enrollment is by permit only.

Interpretation, Public History and Site Management Praxis
HSPV 770-901 , Wunsch/Young/Mason, May 26, 2015 — June 12, 2015

1 course unit. Studio. Pre-requisite: HSPV 600 and 601; 606 preferred. This course is designed to meet two broad learning outcomes: first, solidify graduate students' basic knowledge of public history issues and process; second, apply research and communication skills to the interpretation of specific heritage sites in the context of professional site management. The course will be conducted over three weeks in the early summer and will have two distinct components. The first part of the course will be held on campus over the first week of the three-week course. It will focus on three overall subjects: close reading and debate of the literature on public history, review of case studies, and guest lectures; lectures on interpretation best-practices and philosophies; workshops on integrating design and interpretive tools. The second part of the course will take place in Chicago, related to attending the Vernacular Architecture Forum conference. A third component will take place at a heritage site or sites in or around Philadelphia, and focus on fieldwork and evaluation of sites’ management and interpretive experiences. Working with partners at the site, and in archives, students will research, design and implement an interpretation project. Partners, specific schedule of topics, reading list, and assignments to be determined. Course enrollment is by permit only.