City and Regional Planning

Faculty members Franceca Russello Ammon, Matt Freedman, and Jacob Rivkin
Francesca Russello Ammon, associate professor of historic preservation and city and regional planning; Matt Freedman, lecturer in fine arts; and Jacob Rivkin, lecturer in fine arts, have received G. Holmes Perkins Teaching Awards for 2018-2019.
School Alumna Hahn Named Rome Prize Winner
The American Academy in Rome awarded alumna Ashley Hahn (MCP’08, MSHP’08) the inaugural Adele Chatfield-Taylor Rome Prize for Historic Preservation and Conservation for her project "Preserving the life between buildings." These fellowships are highly competitive and chosen by
Megan S. Ryerson, Francesca Russello Ammon, and Franca Trubiano
Faculty members Megan Ryerson, Francesca Russello Ammon, and Franca Trubiano have been recognized for their leadership in transportation, historic preservation, and building technology.
Philadelphia as seen in the 2016 Metropolitan Equity Report Card
As part of a new initiative from the Department of City and Regional Planning, the Weitzman School is launching a new series of working papers by faculty members and students who are working on issues related to equity.
William Witte

Photo: Related California

Bill Witte (C’73, MCP’75), chairman and CEO of Related California, talks about the challenges and opportunities in the planning profession, and his motivation for establishing the $50,000 Witte-Sakamoto Family Prize at PennDesign.
A Perry World House event with Samantha Power, former United States ambassador to the United Nations,

Photo: Scott Spitzer via Penn Flickr

Three students from PennDesign talk about learning to navigate the world of policy as Graduate Associates at Perry World House.
Yellowstone to Yukon Conservation Initiative. Animal crossing overpass, Banff National Park, Alberta.On view in the Meyerson Galleries.

 Photo © Paul Zizka

Design With Nature Now, echoing the title of McHarg’s 1969 book Design With Nature, takes visitors on a global tour of 25 ongoing or completed projects in 21 nations—from China to the United States, and from Columbia to New Zealand—to measure the political, environmental, and economic dimensions of landscape architecture as practiced today.
Ali Rahim, professor of architecture, speaking at the Penn-China Design Dialogues
In 2015, after a summit in Beijing focused on challenges in Chinese cities, Professor of Architecture and Urban Design and former Dean Marilyn Jordan Taylor, along with Meyerson Chair of Urbanism, Professor and Chair of Landscape Architecture Richard Weller and Professor of Architecture Ali Rahim, launched a two-year joint research initiative with Chinese scholars. She also helped secure a grant from AECOM to run a series of design studios focused on urbanization in China. And just last month, Taylor, Rahim, and Weller hosted a two-day event called the Penn-China Design Dialogues in Beijing, with three panels focused on urban design, architecture, and landscape architecture.
A lot in the Strawberry Mansion neighborhood, Philadelphia.

Photo: Katie Levesque

Philadelphia has around 40,000 vacant lots, ranging in type from small side yards to massive former industrial sites. Most of them—around three quarters—are privately owned, according to the city.
Cypress creek swimming area, Blue Hole Regional Park, from “The Wisdom of Looking Forward Trough Ecological Design and Planning”

Photo Tom Campbell, Design Workshop

In two recent articles, Dean and Paley Professor Fritz Steiner looks at ecosystem services through two distinct lenses: in the context of ecological aesthetics and as a framework for design and planning in the Anthropocene.
Zhongjie Lin
Zhongjie Lin, an associate professor of city and regional planning who joined the faculty in the fall of 2018, talks about change in Philadelphia since he was a PhD student at PennDesign and his interest in utopianism.
Graduate architecture students in the L.A. River channel for a studio led by Florencia Pita, 2017
The Spring 2019 travel studios will take students to at least seven countries and 18 cities on three continents. But the design challenges and cultural traditions they present are even more varied than the list of destinations suggests.

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