Scholarships and Prizes

University of Pennsylvania Stuart Weitzman School of Design Scholarships

Master's Degree Scholarships

Scholarships for master's students may be based on a combination of need and/or merit and are awarded by the Chair of each Department. Funding for these grants and scholarships come from the various sources listed under Weitzman School Awards and are generally given each year of the student's program, provided that full-time status and good academic standing are maintained. They will generally not increase from year to year despite the fact that tuition will likely increase each year. Please note that if you are enrolled in a dual degree program and discontinue one of the programs, your scholarship may be reduced.

Diversity Scholarships

The Weitzman School seeks to bring students to our school whose backgrounds and experiences offer varying perspectives on living and learning in a multicultural world. In order to accomplish this, we offer special Dean's Diversity Scholarships to students whose backgrounds and experiences demonstrate the ability to contribute to increasing socioeconomic and multicultural diversity awareness at the Weitzman School. Dean's Diversity Scholarships range from $12,000 to full tuition and vary depending on achievement and financial need. These scholarships are renewable for a student's entire Weitzman career, provided full-time status and good academic standing are maintained. If you would like to be considered for a Diversity Scholarship, please indicate this on the Admissions Application financial aid section. Briefly describe in your Diversity Statement how you would use this opportunity to increase socioeconomic and multicultural diversity awareness in the discipline for which you are seeking admission. Please be aware that the description is restricted to 500 characters (including spaces) and cannot be submitted through any other medium than the application.

The Moelis Scholars Program provides financial and other support to students in the field of urban planning, particularly those who intend to pursue careers in public/private development or community and economic development. Consideration is given to the applicant's socioeconomic and educational background,  status as a member of an underrepresented minority group, and commitment to ensuring diverse voices in the field so as to enhance the excellence of the program and its mission. Applicants should submit a 550-word essay describing their "dream job" when they graduate from the MCP program, and ten years into the future. They should describe the process that led them to have this dream and how the MCP degree will help them get there. The essay, and any questions regarding the program, should be submitted to cityplan@design.upenn.edu.

Outside Scholarships

We provide a list of outside scholarships on our website that may be available to our graduate students.

In addition, Fastweb.com acts as an outside scholarship database. Students will be able to set up their own personalized profile which is used by Fastweb to determine potential eligibility for outside scholarships.

Awards and Prizes

The Weitzman School offers a range of awards and prizes.

Doctoral Degree Scholarships

The Weitzman School of Design offers a limited number of scholarships to admitted PhD students. These scholarships include full tuition, general fee, clinical fee, health insurance, and a nine-month stipend. Scholarships are generally given each year for three to four years, provided that full-time status and good academic standing are maintained.

Fontaine Scholarships

Fontaine Fellowships support the education of the most underrepresented groups in PhD education. In 1970, an endowment was established posthumously in honor of Dr. William Fontaine, Professor of Philosophy, the first African-American appointed to the Standing Faculty at the University of Pennsylvania. From its inception, the endowment, known as the “Fontaine Fellowship” has been used to advance the University’s goals related to diversity. Originally restricted to students from groups “traditionally and historically underrepresented” in higher education – specifically U.S. African American, Native American, and Hispanic students – diversity is now more broadly defined, and may include, for example, first-generation college students who are from low income families, or students whose backgrounds are most underrepresented in a specific discipline or field. Fontaine funding, in combination with other resources, is used by the schools to recruit a diverse class of PhD students. Fontaine Fellows receive graduate financial aid that is identical to all other funded students in their respective doctoral programs. In addition, the Fontaine Society provides members with opportunities to come together throughout the year to support one another’s academic progress and enhance the University campus as a whole, through their contributions to the scholarly community.