February 1, 2016

Field Notes: The Future of New York City’s Abandoned Island

The gantry and beach provided an access point to North Brother Island. The smokestacks are the most visible built fabric from the Bronx shore. Photo by Andrea Haley.
The gantry and beach provided an access point to North Brother Island. The smokestacks are the most visible built fabric from the Bronx shore. Photo by Andrea Haley.
The view southwest to Hell's Gate Bridge and Manhattan from North Brother Island. Photo by Andrea Haley
The view southwest to Hell's Gate Bridge and Manhattan from North Brother Island. Photo by Andrea Haley
Student Evan Oskierko-Jeznacki takes a picture of the overgrown Nurse's Home. Photo by Andrea Haley.
Student Evan Oskierko-Jeznacki takes a picture of the overgrown Nurse's Home. Photo by Andrea Haley.
The Tuberculosis Pavilion is the largest building, located on the north of the island, amid tall trees, giving the area a cathedral-like feeling. Photo by Andrea Haley.
The Tuberculosis Pavilion is the largest building, located on the north of the island, amid tall trees, giving the area a cathedral-like feeling. Photo by Andrea Haley.
The paths, which follow the historic streets, are periodically unearthed by NYC Parks. Metal curbs, lamp posts, and fire hydrants all show the history of the island, but are overgrown by the ecology. Photo by Andrea Haley.
The paths, which follow the historic streets, are periodically unearthed by NYC Parks. Metal curbs, lamp posts, and fire hydrants all show the history of the island, but are overgrown by the ecology. Photo by Andrea Haley.
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The gantry and beach provided an access point to North Brother Island. The smokestacks are the most visible built fabric from the Bronx shore. Photo by Andrea Haley.
The view southwest to Hell's Gate Bridge and Manhattan from North Brother Island. Photo by Andrea Haley
Student Evan Oskierko-Jeznacki takes a picture of the overgrown Nurse's Home. Photo by Andrea Haley.
The Tuberculosis Pavilion is the largest building, located on the north of the island, amid tall trees, giving the area a cathedral-like feeling. Photo by Andrea Haley.
The paths, which follow the historic streets, are periodically unearthed by NYC Parks. Metal curbs, lamp posts, and fire hydrants all show the history of the island, but are overgrown by the ecology. Photo by Andrea Haley.