Landscape Architecture

Pieces from terrains of wetness: printmaking and making landscape
The pop-exhibition in the Meyerson Lower Gallery curated selected works from a workshop this spring titled terrains of wetness: printmaking and making landscape co-caught by Anu Mathur and Matt Neff to cultivate what they refer to as ‘a watery imagination’.
Sarah and Rivka held a final installation and performance at Meyerson Hall in April. Photo: Wes Chiang.

Sarah and Rivka held a final installation and performance at Meyerson Hall in April. Photo: Wes Chiang.

Civilians are legally barred from crossing the border. So the students “traversed” it, traveling the length of the border on either side, cataloging the terrain, collecting oral histories, and carrying out simultaneous actions. They capped off the research with a performance and exhibition at PennDesign in April.
Jeff Goodell
Jeff Goodell, a contributing editor at Rolling Stone and author of The Water Will Come: Rising Seas, Sinking Cities, and the Remaking of the Civilized World, spoke to a capacity crowd last month in Meyerson Hall. The book, which took Goodell from Miami to Lagos to the Arctic Circle over the course of two-and-a-half years of reporting, provided the foundation for his talk, which was presented as the inaugural lecture for The Ian L. McHarg Center, a new think tank on urbanism and ecology at PennDesign.
Students listen to an interpretive presentation by park staff in order to better understand the site’s complex history.

Students listen to an interpretive presentation by park staff in order to better understand the site’s complex history.

Wedged between the edge of the Rocky Mountains and the Great Plains lies the formidable ruins of Fort Union National Monument. A seemingly endless highway whose sole purpose is to connect the fort to the greater world brings visitors to the site, and long before arrival at the park, the adobe ruins appear on the horizon. At this moment it was easy to picture ourselves as setters arriving at the fort along the Santa Fe Trail. Northern New Mexico is a landscape unlike any other and it is certainly a world apart from the urban hustle and bustle of Philadelphia. This year, graduate students from PennDesign’s landscape architecture and historic preservation programs, enrolled in HSPV 747-401 Conservation and Management of Archaeological Sites & Landscapes with faculty Frank Matero (HSPV) and Clark Erickson (ANTH), once again took on the complex and layered site of Fort Union National Monument, the third and last year of a multi-year project. 
INFINITE SUBURBIA. Background: Rows of apartment buildings
The Department of Landscape Architecture recently hosted alumnus Alan Berger (MLA’90), the Leventhal Professor of Advanced Urbanism at MIT, for a talk based on his latest book, Infinite Suburbia. At over 800 pages, with 52 essays by 74 authors, the book represents a shot at correcting what Berger sees as an imbalance in the design and planning professions: Leading thinkers and practitioners spend most of their efforts on the cores of cities, while globally, populations are moving en masse to their outskirts.
Columbus Monument, Columbus Circle, New York City
After a tumultuous year of public debate about monuments and memorials, New York City recently released the findings of its Mayoral Advisory Commission on City Art, Monuments, and Markers. Among the voices on the Commission was PennDesign alumna Amy Freitag (MLA’94, MSHP’94), who is the executive director of the JM Kaplan Fund. Freitag and the other members of the commission were charged with developing recommendations for how the City of New York should address city-owned monuments and markers on city property, “particularly those that are subject to sustained negative public reaction or may be viewed as inconsistent with the values of New York City”—namely, diversity, equity, and inclusion.
The Weiss/Manfredi team, 2018 National Design Award Winners for Architecture

The Weiss/Manfredi team, 2018 National Design Award Winners for Architecture

The National Design Awards, which have been given since 2000, are intended to “celebrate design as a vital humanistic tool in shaping the world,” and are bestowed are “in recognition of excellence, innovation, and enhancement of the quality of life.”
Graduate Research Fellow Clay Gruber participating in the December Global Shifts Workshop 

Graduate Research Fellow Clay Gruber participating in the December Global Shifts Workshop 

Gruber’s work looks at how the built environment could be designed to anticipate a world where much more work is automated. The question that drives his thesis, entitled 21st Century Boomtown: How can design intelligence be integrated into an increasingly automated and migratory 21st-century labor force? 
Landscape Architecture Studio Mid Reviews under way
Landscape Architecture Studio Mid Reviews are well under way here in Meyerson! Here's a glimpse at two of our studios.
Valley in Rajasthan
From Hallie Morrison and Prakul Pottapu, 3rd Year Landscape Architecture Students:
San José de Costa Rica
To tourists, the Central American nation of Costa Rica is a patchwork of forests and plantations, but nearly half of the country’s inhabitants live in the capital city of San José. It’s the focus of an ambitious interdisciplinary studio this spring, and PennDesign students just returned from an intensive 10-day stay there with instructors David Gouverneur, Associate Professor of Practice in Landscape Architecture, and Lecturer Maria María Altagracia Villalobos.
Sign for "The Architectural League NY Emerging Voices 18"
David Seiter (MLA‘05), principal and design director at Future Green Studio in Brooklyn, is one of the Emerging Voices of 2018 according to The Architectural League of New York.

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