City and Regional Planning

Photo: Hufton + Crow

Assistant Professor of City and Regional Planning Vincent Reina is accepting submissions for The New Affordability Crisis, a symposium co-organized by PennDesign and Oxford.
Building off of a research project for the Lincoln Institute of Land Policy, Assistant Professor Erick Guerra is examinining land use, transportation infrastructure, and commute patterns across Mexico’s 100 largest cities.

Photo by CC

In June of 2018, Assistant Professor of City and Regional Planning Vincent Reina received a University Research Foundation grant to study the impact and effectiveness of the Los Angeles Housing Choice Voucher program, in collaboration with colleagues from the University of Southern California.
MCP 2018 students, Gabrielle Nelson and Joanna Joye, served as Managing Editors on this report which evolved out of John Kromer's Politics of Housing & Urban Development class. This report describes some of the most significant costs and benefits associated with two categories of Philadelphia housing programs: the ten-year tax abatement, which provides an incentive for housing development and improvement; and low-cost housing interventions that prevent homelessness and enable owner-occupants to remain in healthy and safe homes.
Graduate City Planning students at the University of Pennsylvania have conducted a comparative study of gentrification in five growing U.S. cities, and developed an interactive online toolkit to help guide the process of equitable neighborhood development.  Can we fix gentrification by building more housing? Does gentrification cause homelessness? Why should we care about gentrification if neighborhood change is a natural process?
Elevated transportation structures are a common sight throughout Philadelphia.  Cutting through industrial areas, commercial districts, and neighborhoods, they effectively serve the purpose of moving people and goods from one location to another.  This single-minded focus results in an elevated system that largely ignores the surrounding communities.  Whether this neglect helps or hinders the community is less important than the fact that the opportunities presented by these elevated structures is being wasted.  With green stormwater infrastructure, these elevated transp
From the Foreword:
Cities across the globe have been designed with a primary goal of moving people around quickly—and the costs are becoming ever more apparent. The consequences are measured in smoggy air basins, sprawling suburbs, a failure to stem traffic congestion, and 1.25 million traffic fatalities each year. It is clear that change is needed. Instead of planning primarily for mobility, our cities should recalibrate planning and design to focus on the safety, health, and access of people in them.
Welcome to Panorama, PennDesign’s City and Regional Planning journal. Panorama is a student-run publication, collecting the best of students’ work from around the School of Design. You’ll notice that the articles this year range in size, scope, and location. This is purposeful. We believe that Panorama should reflect the work of PennDesign students from around the world, and the cities that influence our daily lives.
Reservoir Hill is a historic, residential neighborhood in centralwest Baltimore. It was initially developed as a gateway to Druid Hill Park, an important and large park in Baltimore. Over time, the neighborhood’s historic estates developed into smaller rowhomes and apartment complexes giving the neighborhood a unique fabric. Although Reservoir Hill lost neighborhood retail during the 1960 riots in Baltimore and a large portion of its population as well, there has been recent effort in reinvigorating its commerce and rehabbing the historic homes.

Photo: haikus via Flickr

Assistant Professor Erick Guerra recently released a report that analyzes, maps, and develops a series of indicators to identify which parts of the Buenos Aires metropolitan area are affordable to lower-income residents, when accounting for the costs of housing and transportation.
The Master of Urban Spatial Analytics (MUSA) program at PennDesign teaches at the intersection of data science and public policy. As part of the program, graduate students from the Department of City and Regional Planning and MUSA participated in the first annual MUSA/Smart Cities Practicum.
Welcome to the 26th edition of Panorama, PennDesign’s City and Regional Planning student journal. As a student-run publication, we strive to represent the very best work of the School of Design. This year is no exception. The work included in the 2018 edition of Panorama explore international and domestic planning
WHY PHILLY?
In Making Plans: How to Engage with Landscape, Design, and the Urban Environment (University of Texas Press, 2018), Dean Frederick Steiner offers a primer on the planning process through a lively, first-hand account of developing plans for the city of Austin and the University of Texas campus.
Slums: How Informal Real Estate Markets Work (University of Pennsylvania, 2016) shows that unauthorized settlements in rapidly growing cities are not divorced from market forces; rather, they must be understood as complex environments where state policies and market actors still do play a role.

Alexandra San Roman, Claudia Elzey, Eric Vincent Riley, Gabriella Nelson, Michael Schaier, Sean Scott; proposed intervention in Bergen Square

Course/Studio: CPLN-600Instructors: John D. Landis, City and Regional Planning, PennDesign; Danae Mobley, City of Philadelphia Water Department; Adam Tecza, Group Melvin Design
Rebooting New England sets forth a strategy to rebuild the economy of New England’s cities, which have been bypassed economically and physically for decades. This strategy is underpinned by a modern high-performance rail network between New York and Boston that would link all of Southern New England’s major cities with these two global cities and with each other. This would serve to integrate the labor and housing markets of the entire New York - New England megaregion into what could become the world’s largest innovation economy.
Queretaro is a flourishing city of nearly 1 million people in central Mexico, located 220km from the capital, Mexico City, within the economically burgeoning Bajio region. A culturally important historic center, Queretaro benefits from a year-round temperate climate, a strong and growing industrial economy, and political leadership invested in increasing multimodal access to all parts of the city for all of its residents through the implementation of progressive bicycle infrastructure planning.
Executive Summary: A responsible Plan for Renewal THE COST OF URBAN RENEWAL Crime and violence have defined the neighborhood of Voto Nacional for decades. In the heart of Bogotá, this once thriving neighborhood has experienced rapid economic decline. Once vibrant street life has been supplanted by violent illicit activities and concentrated poverty. This crime and violence radiates from a set of blocks, called El Bronx, located in the very center of Voto Nacional.

Pages